Engaging your audiences in times of containment - examples from the United States

Let's look at the creative strategies used!

Venues and their artists, staff and suppliers all feel the discomfort and pressure of an uncertain time. We know that the passion for live events will bring the audience back, but we don't know when.

While we work in the isolation of the house or at the box office while keeping a safe distance, it is important to preserve your love for live events. Once we get past this stage - and we will - the return of stage entertainment to the stadiums will help to nourish and heal our hearts and minds. Let's take a look at the creative strategies our American friends use to keep their audiences connected and passionate! We also recommend reading this article on how to make the most of your data.

This will inspire you, satisfy your thirst for entertainment and see how peer-to-peer venues manage to captivate audiences during coronavirus containment.

1 - Live Streaming

Several world-famous venues have started to offer live broadcasts of their shows. You can sell tickets for these virtual events, transfer events for which tickets have already been issued online, or offer free streaming programming to keep your audiences' attention. If you have a sponsorship service, you can also request donations via your own system.

Let us look at some examples from the United States.

For example, the Grand Ole Opry (a weekly live US radio show) will broadcast a weekly stream and share content via its archive. The Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in New York City streamed and then put its production of Hairspray online. And although it is not part of its core programming, Blumenthal Performing Arts (a performance venue in North Carolina) is streaming live the SEED20 event, a competition focused on social innovation and sharing ideas for funding.

2 - Virtual visits

Inviting audiences to take a look behind the scenes is a great way to engage them when your doors are closed. The Mark Twain Museum in Hartford, USA offers both 3D tours and immersive virtual reality experiences. When you take a virtual tour of St. James Cathedral, the organization boasts that it "prays in the same space as Abraham Lincoln, who prayed at St. James" shortly after being elected president in 1860.

You can also create videos from your venue with a simple phone or video camera and a free YouTube account.

3 - Educational content

With schools in many fields, we are all looking for opportunities to learn (and study at home). AudienceView has a number of clients who offer amazing educational content. People of all ages can see lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center or learn about Boise's architecture through the Idaho Preservation Society. It is also possible to explore the Trail of Tears through the Cherokee Historical Association or have fun watching nearly 100 videos on all aspects of theatrical creation from the Real Access Hale at the Hale Centre Theatre.

4 - Share your collections

If you have a collection of photos, paintings or more, you can share them online. 

You can continue to expand your list of potential audiences, even if you don't sell tickets. The Ambassador Theatre Group is running a competition to win free tickets for one year. This is a great way to collect data for future marketing campaigns. Think about what offers or content you can provide to expand your audience list.

5 - Share your experience

Just as television networks will broadcast the legendary games of past seasons, you can present previous productions and events online. This will allow you to enhance your platform, build audience loyalty while giving potential future visitors a taste of your offerings. Here are a few examples:

  • Montreal Symphony Orchestra 
  • The Comedy 1 Magic Club in California
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Apolline Locquet

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Solène Jimenez

Would you like to carry out a data & CDM diagnosis of your organisation? Take advantage of 30 minutes of free consulting by reserving your time.

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    Posted at 11:14am, May 29th

    [...] Reflections on audience loyalty and developmentThe typology of audiences remains more or less the same, however, a high rate of renewal can be observed (60% last year). It is therefore necessary to renew communication and marketing actions every year. Marsatac's image and notoriety are strong, but despite the affection for the brand and the festival, the community was not engaged. So Marsatac began working with Verve to remedy this. Find out more about how to engage your community in a time of containment. […]

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